What I’m Reading

16 Feb

  • We Love DC highlights one of my favorite bartenders in DC, Katie Nelson of The Columbia Room.  Why my favorite? Maybe it’s my love of old things and the fact that the bar transports you back to another time, or that she’s exceptionally talented at creating thoughtful and delicious (strong) drinks.  But it is mainly thanks to Katie’s pleasant southern charm.
  • Boston’s public radio station discusses the restoration and expansion of my favorite museum in the world (sorry to the Smithsonians), the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.  Isabella was one of the country’s foremost female patron of the arts, amassing a collection as she traveled the world.  She was also an eccentric – in 1912, she attended a formal Boston Symphony Orchestra performance with a white headband emblazoned with “Oh, You Red Sox!”  She also left strict instructions that the museum should not be altered in any way after her death.

Isabella Stewart Gardner in Venice, by Anders Zorn

  • In his recent blog post, “It’s Always the Urban Pot that Boils Over”, economist Edward L. Glaeser discusses how the increase of urbanization makes democratic revolution possible: “Cities aren’t just places of economic productivity and cultural innovation. For millennia, they have also been the epicenters of dramatic political upheaval.”
  • DCist takes a closer look at Mary Surratt House in Chinatown (now the Wok & Roll) where John Wilkes Boothe worked on his plans to assassinate Lincoln.  Surratt was the first woman in the US to be sentenced to death for her part of the conspiracy.
  • And finally, thanks to my good looking, single, straight attorney friend Seth for sharing this New Orleans flavored link to an Eatocracy lunchtime poll.
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One Response to “What I’m Reading”

  1. Sally March 1, 2011 at 12:45 am #

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is one of my favorite’s, as well. It’d definitely a feel-good place. And taste-good, too. But I wonder if Isabella is going to haunt the place now that an addition is planned.

    “She also left strict instructions that the museum should not be altered in any way after her death.”

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